Detachment of New Jersey
POW/MIA Committee

Patrick Gallagher, Chairman

Updated May 25, 2016

New Jersey M.i.a. comes home after 50 years 

                                                    

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing from the Vietnam War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

U.S. Air Force 1st Lt. Donald W. Bruch, Jr., 24, of Montclair, New Jersey, will be buried May 29 in East Petersburg, Pennsylvania. On April 29, 1966, Bruch was assigned to the 333rd Tactical Fighter Squadron, as a pilot of an F-105D aircraft. Bruch was flying en route to attack a target north of Hanoi, Vietnam, when his aircraft was struck by enemy anti-aircraft artillery. Witnesses saw Bruch’s aircraft impact the ground, and no ejection or parachute was noted. Bruch was declared missing in action after the crash. On May 4, 1966, a military review board amended his status to deceased.

After numerous joint U.S./Socialist Republic of Vietnam (S.R.V.) investigations dating back to 1988, excavation of a crash site believed to be Bruch’s began during a joint U.S./S.R.V. mission in October and November 2011, finding some human remains and material evidence. Subsequent recovery missions were necessary in October and November 2012, and November and December 2013, to complete the excavation of this difficult crash site and a burial site.

To identify Bruch’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial DNA analysis, which matched his sister, as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

The support from the government of Vietnam was vital to the success of these recovery missions.

Today there are 1,620 Americans that are still unaccounted for from the Vietnam War.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703) 699-1420.

 

 

This should be the most updated list of the pow/mia that have been accounted for ,as of may 25, 2016.

 
Member RankFirst & Last NameServiceUnitLostLocationAccounted-ForSorted By Accounted-For In Descending Order
Seaman 2nd Class Challis R. James U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 5/20/2016
Fireman 1st Class Frank E. Nicoles U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 5/20/2016
Lt. j.g. Aloysius H. Schmitt U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 5/18/2016
Capt. Elwood J. Euart U.S. Army Headquarters, 103rd Field Artillery Battalion, 43rd Infantry Division 10/26/1942 Vanuatu 5/11/2016
1st Lt. Donald L. Beals U.S. Army Air Forces 494th Fighter Squadron, 48th Fighter Group, 9th Air Force 4/17/1945 Germany 5/10/2016
Ensign William M. Finnegan U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 5/9/2016
Ensign John C. England U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 5/6/2016
Fireman 2nd Class James B. Boring U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 5/5/2016
Fireman 3rd Class Edwin C. Hopkins U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 5/4/2016
Sgt. 1st Class James P. Shunney U.S. Army Company I, 3rd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division 11/2/1950 North Korea 5/3/2016
Lt. Julian B. Jordan U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/27/2016
Pvt. Palmer S. Haraldson U.S. Marine Corps Company C, 1st Battalion, 6th Marines, 2nd Marine Division 11/22/1943 Tarawa Atoll 4/25/2016
Pfc. John Saini U.S. Marine Corps Company H, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marines, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa Atoll 4/23/2016
Machinist's Mate 1st Class Harold F. Carney U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/21/2016
Seaman 2nd Class Rudolph V. Piskuran U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/20/2016
Pfc. James B. Johnson U.S. Marine Corps Company K, 3rd Battalion, 8th Marines, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa Atoll 4/18/2016
Fireman 3rd Class Kenneth L. Jayne U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/14/2016
Cpl. George G. Simmons U.S. Army Battery H, 60th Coast Artillery Regiment 11/19/1942 Philippines 4/14/2016
Pvt. John P. Sersha U.S. Army Company F, 325th Glider Infantry Regiment 9/27/1944 Netherlands 4/13/2016
Machinist's Mate 1st Class Alfred F. Wells US Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/7/2016
Pfc. Anthony Brozyna U.S. Marine Corps Company G, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa Atoll 4/6/2016
Ensign Joseph P. Hittorff U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/6/2016
Fire Controlman 1st Class Paul A. Nash U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/5/2016
Chief Storekeeper Herbert J. Hoard U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/4/2016
Pfc. John F. Prince U.S. Marine Corps Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa Atoll 4/2/2016
Seaman 1st Class William E. Welch U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/1/2016
Fireman 3rd Class John H. Lindsley U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/25/2016
Cpl. Dennis D. Buckley U.S. Army A Battery, 15th Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division 2/13/1951 South Korea 3/21/2016
Seaman 2nd Class James N. Phipps U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/21/2016
1st Lt. Frederick W. Langhorst U.S. Army Air Forces 1330 Army Air Force Base Unit, Air Transport Command 7/17/1945 India 3/17/2016
Sgt. 1st Class Alan L. Boyer U.S. Army Command and Control Detachment, 5th Special Forces Group 3/28/1968 Laos 3/16/2016
Motor Machinist's Mate 1st Class John E. Anderson U.S. Navy Landing Craft Tank (LCT), Mark 5, Hull #30 6/6/1944 Omaha Beach, France 3/10/2016
Maj. Dean A. Klenda U.S. Air Force 67th Tactical Fighter Squadron 9/17/1965 Vietnam 3/1/2016
Sgt. 1st Class Raymond K. McMillian U.S. Army Medical Company, 3rd Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division 2/12/1951 South Korea 2/26/2016
Flight Officer Dewey L. Gossett Army Air Forces 527th Fighter Squadron, 86th Fighter Group, 12th Air Force 9/27/1943 Italy 2/25/2016
Cpl. Davey H. Bart U.S. Army Company K, 3rd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division 11/2/1950 North Korea 2/24/2016
Sgt. John C. Holladay U.S. Marine Corps Company B, 1st Marine Raider Battalion, 1st Marine Raider Regiment 7/20/1943 Soloman Islands 2/24/2016
Pfc. Aubrey D. Vaughn U.S. Army Company C, 1st Battalion, 5th Infantry Regiment, 5th Regimental Combat Team 4/23/1951 North Korea 2/24/2016
Seaman 2nd Class Lewis L. Wagoner U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/18/2016
Cpl. Eldon W. Ervin U.S. Army Headquarters Battery, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 7th Infantry Division 11/28/1950 North Korea 2/9/2016
Cpl. Dudley L. Evans U.S. Army Company G, 2nd Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division 2/15/1951 South Korea 1/29/2016
Pfc. Roy A Henderson U.S Army Company B, 1st Battalion, 29th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division 7/27/1950 North Korea 1/14/2016
Cpl. Kenneth R. Stuck U.S. Army Company L, 3rd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division 11/2/1950 North Korea 1/8/2016
Ensign Lewis B. Pride U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 11/4/2015
 
 
 
 
hello my njsal members and the American legion family
 
first let me say it has been my  honor to service as the njsal, P.O.W./M.I.A committee chairman this year. This is a committee that never stops working ,and helps push the issue's about our U.S  P.O.W/M.I.A . there is so much great info out there on the issue .
the updates of the M.I.A ,and the remains that have been found ,and  I.D  through  D.N.A testing.
I would like to thank to chuck Robbins for helping me with location of the website for the D.O.D and league of family.
the info never stops on those websites  
 

Please go to the following web site: www.dtic.mil/dpmo

On this site you will find lists of NJ MIAS from Korea, Vietnam, the Cold War, plus much more great information about “America’s Missing.”

 

HISTORY OF THE POW/MIA FLAG

 

In 1970, Mrs. Michael Hoff, an MIA wife and member of the National League of Families, recognized the need for a symbol of our POW/MIAs.  Prompted by an article in the Jacksonville, Florida, Times-Union, Mrs. Hoff contacted Norman Rivkees, Vice President of Annin & Company, which had made a banner for the newest member of the United Nations, the People’s Republic of China (PRC), as part of their policy to provide flags of all United Nations member states.  Mrs. Hoff found Mr. Rivkees very sympathetic to the POW/MIA issue.  He and an Annin advertising agency employee, Newt Heisley, designed a flag to represent our missing men.

Following approval by the League’s Board of Directors at a meeting held January 22-23, 1972, POW/MIA flags were manufactured for distribution.  Wanting the widest possible dissemination and use of this symbol to advocate for improved treatment for and answers on American POW/MIAs, no trade mark or copyright was sought.  As a result, widespread use of the League’s POW/MIA flag is not restricted legally.  The large volume of commercial production and sales now required to meet demands of federal and state laws does not benefit the League financially, though Annin & Company did contribute a modest amount on one occasion.

On March 9, 1989, an official League flag flown over the White House on National POW/MIA Recognition Day 1988 was installed in the U.S. Capitol Rotunda as a result of legislation passed overwhelmingly during the 100th Congress.  In a demonstration of bipartisan Congressional support, the leadership of both Houses hosted the installation ceremony, at which League Executive Director Ann Mills-Griffiths delivered remarks represented the POW/MIA families.

The League’s POW/MIA flag is the only flag ever displayed in the US Capitol Rotunda where it stands as a powerful symbol of America’s determination to account for US personnel still missing and unaccounted-for from the Vietnam War.  On August 10, 1990, the 101st Congress passed US Public Law 101-355, which recognized the League’s POW/MIA flag and designated it “the symbol of our Nation’s concern and commitment to resolving as fully as possible the fates of Americans still prisoner, missing and unaccounted for in Southeast Asia, thus ending the uncertainty for their families and the Nation”.

 

The importance of the League’s POW/MIA flag lies in its continued visibility, a constant reminder of the plight of America’s POW/MIAs.  Other than “Old Glory,” the League’s POW/MIA flag is the only flag ever to fly over the White House, having been displayed in this place of honor on National POW/MIA Recognition Day since 1982.

Passage by the 105th Congress of Section 1082 of the 1998 Defense Authorization Act required that the League’s POW/MIA flag fly six days each year: Armed Forces Day, Memorial Day, Flag Day, Independence Day, National POW/MIA Recognition Day and Veterans Day.  It must be displayed at the White House, the US Capitol, the Departments of State, Defense and Veterans Affairs, the headquarters of the Selective Service System, major military installations as designated by the Secretary of Defense, all Federal cemeteries and all offices of the US Postal Service.  In addition to the specific dates stipulated, the Department of Veterans Affairs voluntarily displays our POW/MIA flag 24/7.  The National Vietnam Veterans, Korean War Veterans and World War II Memorials are now also required by law to display the POW/MIA flag daily.  Most State Capitols have adopted similar laws, as have local governments nationwide.

 

For a bi-weekly update on the issue that includes most recent identifications, current excavations by JPAC, and up to the minute news I would go the National League of POW/MIA Families web site at: www.pow-miafamilies.org

 

here are some of the update 2014/2015 names ,off the website .there is news release with each name on the site .with a lot great info .
 
I would like to ask every squadrons to  make sure the pubic know about our P.O.W/M.I.A .
if your squadron ,unit, post can ask your local news paper to run a actice on the a few mia that have been I.D . use the P.R hand book to help you with this. or call the detachment P.R chairman on the website www.njsal.org .
we must make sure the pubic know ,why we fly the black flag below are great American flag .
know to us as the pow/mia flag.
 
here our some of the updated M.I.A names from the website  www.dtic.mil/dpmo

News Releases Listing

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
09/28/15: Soldier Missing From Korean War Accounted For (Vars)



News Releases

Soldier Missing From Korean War Accounted For (King)

15-070 | November 02, 2015

 

The Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today the remains of a U.S. serviceman, unaccounted for from the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Cpl. Martin A. King, 18, of Harrisburg, Pa., will be buried Nov. 9 in Annville, Pa. In early November 1950, King was assigned to Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, when his unit was attacked by Chinese forces while occupying a position along the Nammyon River, near Unsan, North Korea. King was reported missing in action on Nov. 2, 1950, while his unit was conducting a fighting withdrawal to a more defensible position.

In 1953, during the prisoner of war exchanges historically known as “Operation Little Switch” and “Operation Big Switch,” American soldiers who were returned told debriefers that King had been captured during the battle and died from malnutrition at Pyoktong POW Camp. His remains were not among those returned by communist forces in 1954.

Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea returned to the United States 208 boxes of commingled human remains, which we now believe contain the remains of at least 600 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war. North Korean documents included in the repatriation indicated that some of the remains were recovered from the area where King was believed to have died.

To identify King’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used circumstantial evidence and forensic identification tools, including mitochondrial and Y-chromosome short tandem repeat DNA analyses, which matched his brother.

Today, more than 7,800 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that were previously turned over by North Korean officials or recovered by American teams.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703) 699-1420.



News Releases

Marine Missing From World War II Accounted For (Reilly)

15-069 | November 02, 2015

 

The Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, unaccounted for since World War II, have been identified and are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Marine Pfc. James P. Reilly, 20, of New York, will be buried Nov. 9 in Bushnell, Fla. In November 1943, Reilly was assigned to Company L, 3rd Battalion, 8th Marines Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting, approximately 1,000 Marines were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded. Reilly was reported killed on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on the island. In 1946 and 1947, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio Island, but Reilly’s remains were not recovered. On Feb. 10, 1949, a military review board declared Reilly non-recoverable.

In June 2015, a nongovernmental organization, History Flight, Inc., notified DPAA that they discovered a burial site on Betio Island and recovered the remains of what they believed were 36 U.S. Marines who fought during the battle in November 1943. The remains were turned over to DPAA in July 2015.

To identify Reilly’s remains, scientists from DPAA used laboratory analysis, to include dental comparisons, which matched Reilly’s records, as well as circumstantial and material evidence, and personal effects recovered during the recovery operations that correlated to Reilly.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000 died during the war.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703) 699-1420.



News Releases

Airman Missing From WWII Accounted For (Pile)

15-071 | November 03, 2015
 

The Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing from World War II, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Air Forces 1st Lt. William O. Pile, 24, of Circleville, Ohio, will be buried Nov. 10 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C. On Dec. 23, 1944, Pile was assigned to the 559th Bombardment Squadron, 387th Bombardment Group, 9th Air Force, and was deployed to Germany. Pile was the pilot of a B-26C Marauder, with eight other crewmen onboard, which crashed after being struck by enemy fire while on a bombing mission against enemy forces near Philippsweiler, Germany. Pile and his co-pilot, 2nd Lt. Robert Ward, were reported killed in action. The other seven crewmen survived the crash by parachuting to safety; however, one crewman was captured by enemy forces and was reported to have died in captivity. His remains were later returned to U.S. custody. Pile and Ward were not recovered during the war.

In April 2009, a Department of Defense (DoD) team traveled to Philippsweiler to interview several German locals who recalled an American war-time crash. The team surveyed the possible crash site.

Between June 2010 and July 2011, two DoD recovery teams excavated the suspected crash site, recovering human remains and aircraft wreckage.

To identify Pile’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used circumstantial evidence and exclusion by mitochondrial DNA testing on a second set of remains associated with Ward.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000 died. Today, more than 73,000 are unaccounted for from the conflict.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703) 699-1420.


News Releases

Soldier Missing From Korean War Accounted For (Chaney)

15-072 | November 06, 2015
Photos
 
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Sgt. 1st Class Dean D. Chaney (Photo by Chaney Family)


Photo Details | Download |

The Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing from the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Sgt. 1st Class Dean D. Chaney, 21, of Bloomville, Ohio, will be buried Nov. 13 in his hometown. In late November, 1950, Chaney was assigned to Company K, 3rd Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, which established defensive positions near Yongsan-dong, North Pyongan Province, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (D.P.R.K.), about ten miles north of the Ch’ongch’on River. About 100 soldiers from the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces set up a roadblock behind the unit and cut off their withdrawal routes. These enemy forces quickly attacked the regiment. It was during this fight that Chaney went missing in action.

In 1953, during the prisoner of war exchanges historically known as “Operation Little Switch” and “Operation Big Switch,” repatriated U.S. soldiers who had been held as prisoners of war reported that Chaney had died from malnutrition at POW Camp 5 in April 1951. A military review board later amended Chaney’s status to deceased.

Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea returned to the United States 208 boxes of commingled human remains, which we now believe contain the remains of at least 600 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war. North Korean documents included in the repatriation indicated that some of the remains were recovered from the area where Chaney was believed to have died.

To Identify Chaney’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used circumstantial evidence and forensic identification tools, including mitochondrial, autosomal chromosome, and Y-chromosome Short Tandem Repeat DNA analyses, which matched two of his brothers.

Today, more than 7,800 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North Korea by American recovery teams.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703) 699-1420.


   

Marine Missing From World War II Accounted For (Nielson)

15-073 | November 09, 2015
 
 

The Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, unaccounted for since World War II, have been identified and are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Marine Cpl. Roger K. Nielson, 22, of Denver, will be buried Nov. 16, in his hometown. In November 1943, Nielson was assigned to Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marines Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting, approximately 1,000 Marines were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded. Nielson was reported killed on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on the island. In 1946 and 1947, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio Island, but Nielson’s remains were not recovered. On Feb. 10, 1949, a military review board declared Nielson non-recoverable.

In June 2015, History Flight, Inc., a non-governmental organization, notified DPAA that they discovered a burial site on Betio Island and recovered the remains of what they believed were U.S. Marines who fought during the battle in November 1943. The remains were turned over to DPAA in July 2015.

To identify Nielson’s remains, scientists from DPAA used laboratory analysis, to include dental comparisons, which matched Nielson’s records, as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000 died during the war.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703) 699-1420.





Nov. 9, 2015 --

Under a serene morning sky, save a low, solemn cadence, honor guardsmen assigned from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) escort the last 4 caskets containing the remains of unidentified service members lost on the USS Oklahoma to loading trucks from their plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP).

The initiative to disinter these 61 caskets began five months ago, after the Deputy Secretary of Defense, Robert O. Work, released a memo allowing the Department of Defense to include remains commingled during the salvage operations of the USS Oklahoma in its identification efforts. Over the last six months DPAA, with the help of the Department of Veteran Affairs, exhumed the remains of up to 388 Service members from 45 graves at the NMCP.

After the remains are verified and accessioned into the DPAA Laboratory, the identification process begins.

“[The] identifications of the dental remains will be completed in Hawaii first,” said Ben Soria, the lead evidence coordinator at the DPAA Lab.

According to Soria, the re-sorting and processing of the post-cranial remains will be performed at the DPAA Laboratory at Offutt Air Force Base in Omaha. Forensic scientists there will also organize the remains into individuals using anthropological and DNA analysis.  

DPAA, in concert with the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory, will use DNA samples donated by applicable family members, as well as medical and dental records, in the identification process. The agency estimates that 80 percent of the unknown remains associated with the USS Oklahoma can be identified within five years. 

More than 70 years have passed since the USS Oklahoma capsized in defense of Pearl Harbor. With new technologies and advances in forensic science now available, DPAA will be able to put names to those previously buried as unknown, something long owed to those who fell. Those remains that still cannot be identified will be reinterred in a known group burial in Arlington National Cemetery, the NMCP, or another as of yet unknown course of action may be taken.

“As important as it is to return the fallen to their families, it’s equally if not more important to the nation,” said Brigadier General Mark Spindler, DPAA deputy director.  “This is our sacred promise that we make to our sons and daughters when we put them in harm’s way and ask them to do the most difficult tasks around.”

“We must work as hard as we can to restore their names,” Spindler continued. “Right now they remain nameless out there, but what we do when we fulfill the nation’s promise is restore the name; give the name back to the nation and give it back to their family.” 
 

USS Oklahoma Disinterments Complete

By SSgt Kathrine Dodd | Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency | November 10, 2015

 
 
 
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U.S. service members from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) participate in a disinterment ceremony, Nov. 9, 2015, at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, Honolulu. DPAA holds these ceremonies to give honor and respect to our nation's unidentified dead before they are moved to the DPAA Lab for identification. The remains being disinterred are unknowns from the USS Oklahoma, lost from the attack on Pearl Harbor during WWII. These are the last of the USS Oklahoma to be disinterred. The mission of DPAA is to provide the fullest possible accounting for our missing personnel to their families and the nation. (DOD photo by Spc. Crystal D. Madriz) (Photo by Spc. Crystal Madriz)


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Members of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) march alongside a disinterred casket holding the remains of unknown USS Oklahoma service members during a disinterment ceremony at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, Nov. 5, 2015. Today’s ceremony was the final disinterment for the USS Oklahoma. The DPAA mission is to provide the fullest possible accounting for our missing personnel to their families and the nation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. La'Shanette Garrett/Released) (Photo by SSgt La'Shanette Garrett)


  |   |  
 

U.S. service members from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) participate in a disinterment ceremony, Nov. 9, 2015, at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, Honolulu. DPAA holds these ceremonies to give honor and respect to our nation's unidentified dead before they are moved to the DPAA Lab for identification. The remains being disinterred are unknowns from the USS Oklahoma, lost from the attack on Pearl Harbor during WWII. These are the last of the USS Oklahoma to be disinterred. The mission of DPAA is to provide the fullest possible accounting for our missing personnel to their families and the nation. (DOD photo by Spc Crystal D. Madriz/Released) (Photo by Spc. Crystal Madriz)


         
Nov. 9, 2015 --

Under a serene morning sky, save a low, solemn cadence, honor guardsmen assigned from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) escort the last 4 caskets containing the remains of unidentified service members lost on the USS Oklahoma to loading trucks from their plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP).

The initiative to disinter these 61 caskets began five months ago, after the Deputy Secretary of Defense, Robert O. Work, released a memo allowing the Department of Defense to include remains commingled during the salvage operations of the USS Oklahoma in its identification efforts. Over the last six months DPAA, with the help of the Department of Veteran Affairs, exhumed the remains of up to 388 Service members from 45 graves at the NMCP.

After the remains are verified and accessioned into the DPAA Laboratory, the identification process begins.

“[The] identifications of the dental remains will be completed in Hawaii first,” said Ben Soria, the lead evidence coordinator at the DPAA Lab.

According to Soria, the re-sorting and processing of the post-cranial remains will be performed at the DPAA Laboratory at Offutt Air Force Base in Omaha. Forensic scientists there will also organize the remains into individuals using anthropological and DNA analysis.  

DPAA, in concert with the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory, will use DNA samples donated by applicable family members, as well as medical and dental records, in the identification process. The agency estimates that 80 percent of the unknown remains associated with the USS Oklahoma can be identified within five years. 

More than 70 years have passed since the USS Oklahoma capsized in defense of Pearl Harbor. With new technologies and advances in forensic science now available, DPAA will be able to put names to those previously buried as unknown, something long owed to those who fell. Those remains that still cannot be identified will be reinterred in a known group burial in Arlington National Cemetery, the NMCP, or another as of yet unknown course of action may be taken.

“As important as it is to return the fallen to their families, it’s equally if not more important to the nation,” said Brigadier General Mark Spindler, DPAA deputy director.  “This is our sacred promise that we make to our sons and daughters when we put them in harm’s way and ask them to do the most difficult tasks around.”

“We must work as hard as we can to restore their names,” Spindler continued. “Right now they remain nameless out there, but what we do when we fulfill the nation’s promise is restore the name; give the name back to the nation and give it back to their family.”
Pvt. John H. Klopp U.S. Army 126th Infantry Regiment, 32nd Infantry Division 12/5/1942 Papua New Guinea 10/15/2015
Sgt. 1st Class Dean D. Chaney U.S. Army Company K, 3rd Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division 11/28/1950 North Korea 10/8/2015
Cpl. Roger K. Nielson U.S. Marine Corps Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marines Regiment, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa 9/24/2015
Cpl. Robert P. Graham U.S. Army Company A, 13th Engineer Combat Battalion, 7th Infantry Division 2/13/1951 North Korea 9/22/2015
Pfc. Frank Worley U.S. Army Battery, 503rd Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division 2/12/1951 North Korea 9/19/2015
Cpl. Martin A. King U.S. Army Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division 11/2/1950 North Korea 9/16/2015
Cpl. Robert V. Witt U.S. Army Company, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division 12/2/1950 North Korea 9/11/2015
Cpl. George H. Mason U.S. Army 2nd Reconnaissance Company, 2nd Infantry Division 2/14/1951 North Korea 9/8/2015
Pfc. James P. Reilly U.S. Marine Corps Company L, 3rd Battalion, 8th Marines Regiment, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa 9/5/2015
Cpl. James D. Otto U.S. Marine Corps Company L, 3rd Battalion, 8th Marines Regiment, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa 9/5/2015
Cpl. Robert E. Meyers U.S. Army Company A, 2nd Engineer Combat Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division 12/1/1950 North Korea 9/4/2015
1st Lt. Alexander Bonnyman U.S. Marine Corps Company F, 2nd Battalion, 18th Marines Regiment, 2nd Marine Division 11/22/1943 Tawara 8/27/2015
Cpl. Charles E. Ivey U.S. Army Company K, 3rd Battalion, 187th Airborne Infantry Regiment 11/29/1950 North Korea 8/21/2015
 
 
 
 
 
Sgt. Floyd J.R. Jackson U.S. Army Headquarters Company, 3rd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division 12/12/1950 North Korea 1/27/2105
Pfc. Lotchie J.R. Jones U.S. Army Company B, 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division 2/28/1951 North Korea 2/26/2015
Staff Sgt. Bunyan D. Price Jr. U.S. Army 2nd Battalion, 34th Armor Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division 5/2/1970 Vietnam 2/25/2015
Pfc. John R. Bowers U.S. Army Company L, 3rd Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division 2/14/1951 South Korea 2/20/2015
2nd Lt. John W. Herb U.S. Army Air Forces 1st Air Division, 359th Fighter Group,368th Fighter Squadron 4/13/1945 Germany 2/19/2015
2nd Lt. Stephen V. Biezis U.S. Army Air Forces 575th Bombardment Squadron, 391st Bombardment Group, 9th Air Force 12/23/1944 Germany 2/3/2015
Sgt. Arnold V. Andring U.S. Army Company L, 3rd Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 8th Army 2/4/1951 North Korea 1/28/2015
2nd Lt. Alvin Beethe U.S. Army Air Forces 393rd Fighter Squadron, 367th Fighter Group, 9th Air Force 11/26/1944 Germany 1/28/2015
1st Lt. James F. Gatlin, Jr. U.S. Army Air Forces 575th Bombardment Squadron, 391st Bombardment Group, 9th Air Force 12/23/1944 Germany 1/26/2015
Cpl. Lindsey C. Lockett U.S. Army Medical Detachment, Headquarters Battery, 503rd Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division 12/1/1950 North Korea 1/26/2015
Capt. David Chorlins U.S. Air Force 602nd Special Operations Squadron, 34th Tactical Group 1/11/1970 Laos 1/17/2015
Cpl. C.G. Bolden U.S. Army Company C, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division 1/5/1951 North Korea 1/16/2015
Sgt. 1st Class Donald R. Strum U.S. Army Company C, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division 11/4/1950 North Korea 1/13/2015
Sgt. 1st Class James W. Holt U.S. Army Company C, 5th Special Forces Group 2/7/1968 Vietnam 1/10/2015
Cpl. Robert Higgins U.S. Army Battery C, 15th Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division 2/13/1951 South Korea 1/6/2015
Sgt. Joseph M. Snock, Jr. U.S. Army Heavy Mortar Company, 31st Infantry Regiment 11/30/1950 North Korea 1/5/2015
Sgt. Richard J. Archambeault U.S. Army Company L, 3rd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division 11/2/1950 North Korea 4/29/2014
Staff Sgt. David R. Kittredge U.S. Army Air Forces 450th Bomber Squadron, 322nd Bomber Group, Medium, 9th Air Force 4/16/1945 Germany 4/23/2014
Cpl. Harold W. Reed U.S. Marine Corps Weapons Company, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division 11/29/1950 North Korea 4/22/2014
Cpl. William N. Bonner U.S. Army Medical Company, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division 5/31/1951 North Korea 4/22/2014
Cpl. Richard Isbell U.S. Army Company H, 2nd Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division 4/25/1951 South Korea 4/17/2014
Pfc. Arthur Richardson U.S. Army Company A, 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division 1/1/1951 South Korea 3/21/2014
Cpl.<